Category Archives: Random Thoughts

Shared passwords: the new “friendship ring” among kids?

Just when you thought you knew everything you needed to know on what to warn/teach your kids about using Facebook and the Internet…have you heard that kids/teens/20-somethings share their passwords with each other, for everything from email accounts, Facebook and other services? According to a recent New York Times article, it’s a widespread practice among young people, even among young couples who are dating.  Apparently in the dating realm, it’s a sign of trust– i.e. “if I’m your only love, prove it with an all-access pass to your Internet accounts.”  Gee, nothing says “love” quite like mistrusting someone, huh? And I guess nothing says “I’m a stupid risk taker” quite like that either, since of course breakups can be messy, and BFF’s can become BFN’s (Best Friends Never) faster than Justin Bieber can swoosh his hair.  Who wants to risk being kicked off a sports team or not being able to get a job because of an angry or inappropriate post they didn’t even write? Not to mention losing all of their carefully acquired Facebook Friends…but of course kids think they know how the world works, better than we adults…

When I read about this “practice” in the news this morning, I thought that surely my kids don’t share passwords with other kids–  but I thought I’d better check, anyway.  Turns out Allison doesn’t, but Emmie said she does, with one friend. Amazing.  I told her why that wasn’t a good idea and that she needed to change it, and of course she gave the answer I expected: “Mom, she would never post anything bad about me!”  Well, I hope she never does, but if Emmie’s wrong, I guess it will just be a hard lesson that can only be taught from experience… 

If anyone has any other ideas for dealing with this situation, let me know!

And while we’re talking about Facebook, I wanted to let everyone know that Uncoolmom.com now has an official Facebook page (I know, I know, it’s about time).  This is different from the blog’s presence on Facebook’s Networked Blogs application– the official Facebook “page” is just like any other “fan” or organization page, where you can “Like” it, post things to the Wall, and get in on other quick bits of information I might post there that are not on the blog. So please check it out and “Like” it while you are there! Click here or you can search for it by typing UncoolMomDotCom into the Facebook search bar, which is the name of the page.  Enjoy!

Where Everybody Knows Your Name

The TV show Cheers was a hit with audiences not only because of its great writing and acting, but we were also attracted to the basic premise of the setting– a hang-out “where everybody knows your name”—and for a lot of us who don’t frequent a neighborhood bar, we secretly wished we could find that kind of camaraderie and familiarity someplace.  Or, at least live in a town where all the clerks know your name—like the town of Mayberry (from “The Andy Griffith Show”), another TV setting we Baby Boomers loved.  At least, I did.  Even though I was from a town of only 28,000, I always envied kids I knew from much smaller towns, and loved to visit them for a weekend.  You’d think that when I moved to friendly Texas, it wouldn’t be hard to experience a small town feeling no matter where I lived—but it really hasn’t happened for me.  Well, except for church.  Andy and I chose a small church so we wouldn’t feel like a number, and we haven’t been disappointed.  And, our kids did attend the smallest public elementary school in town—at times, there was only one class per grade! But Mayberry in suburban Dallas? I keep hoping to find it.

Maybe I haven’t yet because I’m more introverted than extroverted.  My Houston sister-in-law, who is one of the friendliest, most outgoing and nicest persons around, is known by all the clerks and stores that she frequents.  Clothing stores, restaurants…they know what she needs before she says a word. They know her name and she knows theirs.  And I’ll bet she knows if they have kids, and their kids’ names, too. 

Maybe I don’t feel that small town vibe around here because there’s nowhere that I frequent that much…well, I do go to the gas station every week, but I pump my own…I do go to the grocery store usually once or twice a day…but at Tom Thumb, there’s rarely the same checker each time, and now, to make things even more impersonal, they’ve added several self check-out stands.  At Sprouts…was that a glimmer of recognition I saw on a clerk’s face last week? Maybe, but…everywhere I go, I feel that everyone in line behind me is rushed and busy, like me, and they don’t want to wait any longer than they have to from people yakking…and so I usually opt for as few words as possible.

Which is why a highlight of our city’s recent music festival happened, for me, as Emmie, Andy, and I were walking out of the festival late last Saturday night—we were recognized by one of the managers of a local restaurant that I guess we really do frequent—Freebirds World Burrito.  “Hey!” he said, smiling, waving and walking over to us.  We waved, too.  “You know us!!!!” I said.  “You recognize us!” 
“Of course I do,” he said.  I almost kissed his feet.  I turned to Andy and said excitedly, “See, this means we’ve gone to Freebirds so much that he recognizes us—isn’t that cool?!!! WOW!!!!” Before I could do a Steve Martin happy dance, the manager said, “Well, I just want you to know that it’s been a pleasure rolling your burritos all these months.  My last day is tomorrow.”
WHAT? I finally find someone from a community business who knows us, and he’s LEAVING? 
“ I just finished college last week,” he said, “ and I’m going back home to live.” 

We wished him well.  Too bad we never knew his name, and he didn’t know ours, either…

Some Brief Thoughts About Charlie Sheen


In the midst of all the Charlie Sheen craziness—doesn’t your heart go out to his family? How painful it must be to see your son, father, brother say such embarrassing things in such a public way.  Every time he opens his mouth, it just keeps getting worse.  John Stamos summed it up nicely the other day after it was rumored that he was replacing Sheen on Two and a Half Men: “I am not replacing Charlie Sheen on Two And A Half Men.  However, Martin Sheen has asked me to be his son…”

I know, I know—Charlie’s an adult and it’s not anyone’s fault but his own, but I’m sure his family is still wondering where they went wrong…and they’ve probably been wondering for a long time, long before his cars were driven off cliffs and long before he called his boss a “worm”.  Does anyone remember that he co-founded a high-end children’s clothing line in 2005? No, not with one of his wives.  He collaborated with another guy who was a “childhood friend and experienced fashion executive”.   I remember first learning about it when watching an episode of The Ellen DeGeneres Show .  There he was, talking about “children’s couture” and trotting out precocious kids to model his line of “sturdy yet stylish” fashions.  Huh? Called “Sheen Kidz”, the clothes “demonstrated beautiful hand-designed embroidery, shirring and pleating, and unique graphic design”.  (This from a guy who prides himself on being a macho party animal?) The company’s website is still up, but the clothes haven’t been made for about three years.  All I could find in a quick online search was a Girls Size 5 Tank Top on ebay with a starting bid of $3.99 (and zero bidders).  Eeew—I don’t care how fine the fabric—would you really want your child wearing something that probably helped pay off Charlie Sheen’s  gambling debts or prostitute tabs? 

Sheen Kidz might just go down in history as the most unlikely celebrity product endorsement ever, even weirder than Jimmy Johnson hawking Extendz on late-night TV.  Um, maybe celebrities would be smart to just steer clear of all products with a “z” at the end of the name!

The Super Bowl is in Town…Should I Be Excited? Plus: A Unique Snack for Gringo Super Bowl Parties

My metropolitan area is experiencing two Big Firsts this week. It’s the first time since anyone can remember that all area school districts have been closed for four days straight due to snow and ice, and the first time our fair metroplex has hosted a Super Bowl. Super Bowl XLV, comin’ to a domed stadium about 45 minutes from me.   The most-watched sporting event in the U.S. …Amidst rolling power outages, dwindling food in the fridge, squirrels (or is it mice?) taking refuge in our garage, kids who’d rather not be holed up together for four days straight, and a flat tire on the aravan when I finally did get out to drive on the ice—do I care?

Maybe if the Super Bowl Half Time entertainers, The Black Eyed Peas, had come along in their limo when I needed a ride home from my flat-tired car…  I guess the only thing that Super Bowl XLV has done for me is it’s brought some good humor along with it—writers like the Dallas Morning News’ Jacquielynn Floyd have been dishing out some funny
commentary about how the world is preparing for a Dallas Super Bowl (Blowing up inflatable cacti to put next to their TV screens? Really?) and local businesses are trying to cash in with some pretty corny advertising (“Get Your Game Face On” implored the ad in today’s paper from a store’s cosmetics department—“Score a touchdown with a touchup! Discover the secrets to playmaking lashes! Kick off with our spring color collection!”).  And, I am looking forward to the annual Super Bowl party we attend, where we’ll see friends we haven’t seen since Super Bowl 44. 

But other than that, the Super Bowl’s nearby presence  is really not affecting me that much.  That is, unless the legions of fans and celebrities in town seek out local blogs for information– since the words “Super Bowl” are in the title of this post, they just might find Uncool Mom, stop by for a visit, click on my ads, and help me greatly increase my revenue.  Then I would be forever grateful to Jerry Jones, the owner of the Dallas Cowboys and impresario of Cowboys Stadium.

Sooooo, with that in mind, I’d like to offer up my recommendation to any out-of-towners that may be reading this: before you leave town, buy some Takis. You know how regions of the country have certain packaged foods you can’t get anywhere else? For example, in Southeast Iowa they have Sterzing’s Potato Chips.  And my east coast friends crave Tastykakes, a Dolly Madison/Hostess type of confection found in stores “back home”.  Well, for a taste of North Texas that might not be readily accessible back home, Packers and Steelers fans should put a few bags of Takis in their suitcase before they leave.  “Taki” is a take-off on the word “taquito”, i.e. a tightly rolled-up corn tortilla stuffed with meat and then fried, a staple at area Tex-Mex restaurants. The Takis bagged snacks are basically a taquito minus the stuffing, and rolled in various yummy seasonings.  They are made in Mexico by a company called Barcel and distributed in the U.S. by Bimbo.  My youngest child first found out about them earlier this year at the school lunch table, when a Hispanic student pulled them out of her lunch bag and shared.  Emmie and the rest of us have been hooked ever since.  We’ve been able to find them at area gas station convenience stores and at the Hispanic grocery chain, Fiesta (and upon calling Bimbo, I found out they are also available at some Wal Marts, and online at www.mexgrocer.com).  I’m not a big champion of snack foods, but I must say, Takis are REALLY GOOD and from looking at the nutrition facts, a bit better for you than the average potato chip. They come in five flavors (Guacamole is my favorite—Fuego and Nitro are so hot they make spicy food fans cry) and luckily we bought all five before the storm hit—when Emmie and her friends come inside after playing in the snow, I’ve been hearing a lot of “Can we have some Takis and hot chocolate?”  Yes, definitely a unique way to warm up… 

Unfortunately, I won’t be taking a bag to our friends’ Super Bowl party.  I’ve been assigned to bring vegetables—“either hot or cold or both” the note said.  But hey—since guacamole is made with avocados, maybe I will sneak a few guac Takis on that veggie tray…

One Day On Earth: What Will You Be Doing on 10-10-10?

I once mentioned the book A Day in the Life of America in a blog post, a popular book of photographs taken across the U.S. all on the same day, 5/2/86.  What I didn’t mention was how much I like that concept, of recognizing all the things that can happen at the same time on one day, or at one moment.  My children and I have even played a “Right Now” game a few times instead of a bedtime story, where we each take turns trying to think of something that’s no doubt happening somewhere at that very moment.  “Right now, someone is waking up and starting a new job.”  “Right now, someone is being born.”  “Right now, someone is watching a movie…” you get the idea.  It’s fun (and intriguing), because we know we’re all probably right. 

 

Books like A Day in the Life of America also capture the beauty in the ordinary, to which I always give a big thumbs up.

 

So you can see why I’m excited about the One Day on Earth project, happening on 10-10-10. If you haven’t heard of it before, it’s a planned “global video snapshot” of a 24-hour period on earth, with people shooting video all across the globe.  Anyone can participate by heading to www.onedayonearth.org.  Portions of the footage will be made into a feature-length documentary to be released next year, and all the footage will be available in an online archive.  Everyone from teenagers with cell phones to Academy Award-nominated filmmakers are expected to take part (so far, it looks like about 5,000 people in the U.S. are on board).  The One Day on Earth website says, “All are welcome to participate; the greater the quality and quantity of participation, the greater our impact on society.” Well, I’m not sure what kind of impact that will be—I just think it will be fascinating.

 

I’ve applied to be one of the participants, and am waiting to see if I get approved.  In the meantime, I better re-learn how to work that family video camera again…

One Day On Earth: What Will You Be Doing on 10-10-10?

I once mentioned the book A Day in the Life of America in a blog post, a popular book of photographs taken across the U.S. all on the same day, 5/2/86.  What I didn’t mention was how much I like that concept, of recognizing all the things that can happen at the same time on one day, or at one moment.  My children and I have even played a “Right Now” game a few times instead of a bedtime story, where we each take turns trying to think of something that’s no doubt happening somewhere at that very moment.  “Right now, someone is waking up and starting a new job.”  “Right now, someone is being born.”  “Right now, someone is watching a movie…” you get the idea.  It’s fun (and intriguing), because we know we’re all probably right. 

 

Books like A Day in the Life of America also capture the beauty in the ordinary, to which I always give a big thumbs up.

 

So you can see why I’m excited about the One Day on Earth project, happening on 10-10-10. If you haven’t heard of it before, it’s a planned “global video snapshot” of a 24-hour period on earth, with people shooting video all across the globe.  Anyone can participate by heading to www.onedayonearth.org.  Portions of the footage will be made into a feature-length documentary to be released next year, and all the footage will be available in an online archive.  Everyone from teenagers with cell phones to Academy Award-nominated filmmakers are expected to take part (so far, it looks like about 5,000 people in the U.S. are on board).  The One Day on Earth website says, “All are welcome to participate; the greater the quality and quantity of participation, the greater our impact on society.” Well, I’m not sure what kind of impact that will be—I just think it will be fascinating.

 

I’ve applied to be one of the participants, and am waiting to see if I get approved.  In the meantime, I better re-learn how to work that family video camera again…

Odd Mom Out: When Your Kids Don’t Resemble You…At All

     
I carried them for nine months and nursed them for at least as long; went through morning sickness, nausea, a C-section, VBAC, migraine headaches, and major sleep loss for them; got carpal tunnel syndrome and had to completely change my wardrobe —you’d think my kids could at least look like me in some way.  Some daily, visual nod to the fact that I AM THEIR MOTHER.  But in my case and that of many other moms, “it just ain’t so”.  I mean, there are adoptive moms I know who resemble their children more than I resemble mine.  Neither one of my kids looks anything like me– not that I would want them to completely, but it would be great if at least one of them had eyes like mine, or maybe the shape of their face…instead, I have to be satisfied with sharing “sort of similar hair color” and “crowded mouth” with Emmie, and “hair thickness” and “excellent teeth enamel quality” with Allison.  Nothing else, at least that I can see.  Allison’s eyes are like Andy’s father’s, her ginger hair color is Andy’s mom’s, ditto for her myriad of freckles, and her face shape is all-Andy.  Emmie’s eyes, nose and face shape are all-Andy, and she has freckles, too. 

 

I just think there’s something nice about family members looking alike, especially when there’s more than one child in a family, with some children favoring the mom, some resembling the dad.  It’s like a “balanced tribe”.  My brother and I look like my mom; my sister looks like my dad.  Andy looks like his mom; his sister looks like his dad. 

As we age and change, sometimes it takes old photos to see the resemblance.  I have a friend who once posted a couple of her and her husband’s elementary school photos on their fridge, next to their two sons’ school photos taken in the same grade.  I’d never thought they looked so much like their kids, but the resemblance was uncanny—hers was almost identical to her oldest son’s photo; her husband’s was identical to the youngest son’s.  Last Sunday, I had the chance to do something similar for a mother-daughter tea hosted by Allison’s drill team.  For a party decoration, they requested that every mom submit childhood photos of themselves and their daughters taken at the same ages.  I found a school photo of me in 4th grade, and paired it with Allison’s 4th grade school photo.  There they were, side by side at the tea, magneted to a giant metal wall.  Nope, not a shred of similarity between the two photos (other than the fact that 70’s fashion was in vogue when both pictures were taken– Allison’s crocheted poncho looks almost as groovy as my plaid vest!! ).  Many other pairs on that wall looked like twins.

 

Yep, I think it’s an exclusive club, we non-look-alike moms. Sometimes it’s especially hard being in it, like for women who have gone through rough divorces—with their kids looking very much like their exes, I’m sure that sometimes it’s a painful reminder.  Or women who are the mothers of all boys who resemble only their father. Talk about feeling like an outsider!

 

Guess I should count my blessings that right now I don’t look like my kids.  At a time in their lives when Mom is uncool and they’re trying to carve out their own identities, maybe looking like me would only make things worse.  And maybe it’s especially good for those days when they misbehave in public, when I hope, hope, hope no one thinks I’m their mother.  I’m certain I’d be pretty believable if I shrugged my shoulders and said, to sympathetic onlookers, “I’m just the chauffeur!”

The Quiet Milestones

Parents like to celebrate a lot of “firsts”, don’t we?  Some are commemorated in a big way, with photographs, words in a baby book or scrapbook, video… like first smile, first solid food, first steps, first tooth, first word, first birthday, first haircut.  As kids get older, firsts occur less frequently, but we still try to look for them and celebrate them—first lost tooth, first day of school, first time to ride a bike…first time at summer camp, first time to get ears pierced (who’d have thought there’d be a second time?), first car…celebrating “firsts” adds fun to our often mundane lives and helps kids feel special.  And I think it helps parents feel, well, like parents—proud, happy and sometimes sad, all rolled together.  But as we all know, the second child and all others to follow usually get shortchanged in this commemoration.  There are definitely less photos of “firsts” in our house for Emmie than for Allison.  I remember when I finally got around to grabbing the camera to take a picture of Emmie’s gaping hole where her first lost tooth had been, the new tooth was already showing itself quite nicely.

 

But even when I don’t make a big deal of milestones, I’m quietly commemorating them in my heart, often ones that other parents might not give a second thought…  I can remember the first time I was caught in the rain with Allison and the first time she was big enough to sit in the front seat of the car.  I remember the first night Emmie slept in a “big girl bed” instead of a crib– that look of happiness and pride is unforgettable.  I remember the first time she jumped off a diving board at the neighborhood pool.  There was that look of happiness and pride again.   And recently I’ve noticed another quiet milestone going on, throughout this school year, that I don’t think Emmie’s paying as much attention to as I am—she definitely doesn’t share my twinge of sadness, which is probably good.  This is the year that pretend play is ending.  She’s 11 years old and in fifth grade, so I guess I should consider myself lucky that it’s lasted this long.  And guess I should be happy that I’m going to have more space in my house, since there is much more to our spring cleaning this year than usual.  All those costumes I’ve saved over time, all those costumes I’d buy on cut-rate special the day after Halloween and use as great Christmas presents and the girls would have hours and hours of fun with them…not long ago I realized that not only do most of them hardly fit Emmie any more, but “dressing up” is no longer how she and her friends want to spend their time together. At least not dressing up like princesses and fairies.  Time to give some costumes to her younger cousin, as well as all the crowns and plastic dress-up shoes that go with them.  Bratz Dolls? She recently gave them to a charity.  The play kitchen and plastic food? Ditto.  The toy vacuum cleaner, fake cash register, doll stroller, and doll bunk bed? Given to a cousin last month.  All those Webkinz stuffed animals Emmie so carefully saved money to buy and was still collecting less than a year ago? They are now “too childish” and have been put in a “to be decided later” drawer.  Waiting in the wings to be boxed and given away are “tons” of tiny Polly Pocket dolls and accessories and something called Littlest Pet Shop…

 

Not only has she outgrown pretend play this year, she says she’s outgrown the color pink and wants to re-do her pink bedroom.  Since Andy and I are not quite ready to do that, she decided last week to make a few changes to her room on her own, to make it feel more “hers”.  All by herself, she re-arranged furniture and moved out “stuff” she didn’t want.  This morning after she went to school, I found myself standing in the doorway of those four still-very-pink painted walls, looking at the result of her efforts and noticing how it’s like a perfect “diorama” of the current transition in her life… several Barbies and her two American Girl dolls still sit on shelves; her electric and acoustic guitars are also on display, propped on stands on the floor next to her amplifier; a satiny pastel purple poodle skirt made the cut from the costume collection; the gigantic face of Robert Pattinson broods out from her Twilight “Team Edward” blanket which she’s thrown on her bed, covering up her “flowers and butterflies” bedspread…  and a small cardboard box “bank” she created for herself sits on top of her chest of drawers, covered in construction paper with the words “Money for My New Bedroom” scrawled in marker on the sides… (there were a few coins in it).

 

I don’t think a scrapbook page would do this scene justice, so I’ll count this milestone memory as another that will just have to be photographed on my heart (and written in my blog).

 

Punch-drunk on Punch Cards

The main zipper on my favorite (and only) wallet jumped the tracks the other day, and I think I know why:  too many punch cards.  Nope, it’s not too many credit cards (and certainly not cash) that have caused my favorite brown leather four-compartment wallet to bulge at the seams—it’s those darn punch cards and reward cards that every place of business seems to be giving me these days.  And I can’t resist a bargain, so I can’t resist those cards.  I mean, if I buy 5 pairs of pointe shoes for my ballet dancing teen daughter, I can get one pair free? Never mind that it will probably take 4-5 years before the card is filled and she will be in college by then— by golly, at $50 a pair, I’d better get some kind of gold star for purchasing them.  And that little signature and checkmark they put on the card gives me the tiny sense that I’m getting some kind of a deal—even though I’m probably not. 

 

I’m also a card-carrying member of the JC Penney Watch Battery Club, the Ulta Beauty Club, Borders Rewards, OfficeMax MaxPerks, Blockbuster Rewards, Tom Thumb Rewards, Delia’s Frequent Buyers, Corner Bakery’s Cup of Joe Club and the “Cool Rewards Club” at Cool Cuts 4 Kids (Gee, can I put all those memberships on my resume’?  Well, a stay-at-home mom’s gotta have something!) I’m a Freebirds Fanatic and also carry “loyalty” cards for Which Wich, Great Harvest Bread, Albertsons, Hallmark and CVS.  And not only do I have a card from Sandy’s Dancewear for pointe shoes, I have one for Jazz/Lyrical, Ballet shoes, and Tights.   

 

Oh, sure, I could keep them in a drawer or file at home and only take them out when I need them— but seriously, what busy mom can remember that? It’s hard enough to remember where I put my keys, and remember to take along my environmentally-friendly cloth shopping bags when I go shopping, and remember to then grab them out of the car once I get where I’m going.  Remembering to also grab the right punch cards just isn’t going to happen.  And besides, I don’t always know when I’ll need them.  When I’ve tried keeping them at home, I end up at Smoothie King with the kids for an impromptu after-school snack, without (horrors!) my Smoothie King Frequent Buyer Card, and I can’t stand not getting credit for my purchase, and so what happens? I get another punch card.  “Just combine the two to get your next free smoothie,” says the nice dark-haired lady behind the counter.  Great.  Two-for-one.

 

And so, the stack of buyer cards keeps growing, and my wallet just keeps getting fatter.  Maybe I should get one of those business card holders to house them, and throw that in my purse. Or get a purse with an extra compartment. At the very least, get a new wallet with more room. It looks like I’m going to be forced to do that, anyway.  While I miraculously fixed that broken zipper (and for any of you who have tried to fix a broken zipper on a wallet, you know that is no small feat), the next day, even though the zipper teeth stayed in place, the fabric surrounding it ripped away from the rest of the wallet.  Must have been that new Whole Foods Vitamin Card I just got…

Life-By-T-Shirt

I think a historian or sociologist of the future will be able to tell a lot about the teens in our current society simply by reading their T-shirts.  Oh, I don’t mean the ones with Will Ferrell’s picture that say “More Cowbell” or Jonas Brothers shirts or even the revamped “Have A Nice Day” tie-dyed ones, although those would definitely add to the picture– I mean the ones that tell what the kids are doing all the time, at any minute.  Seriously, if their Facebook pages fade away and our blogs and scrapbooks perish, those cotton T-shirts will still probably live on somewhere, maybe in a homeless shelter, proclaiming everything from high school dances to sporting events to drama productions, and everything in between.  There’s a shirt for every occasion, every club, extracurricular activity, fundraiser, choir/band concert tour, and drill team show; every out-of-town field trip and summer training camp— there’s even an organization that Allison joined (SADD) just to be able to wear the shirt.  And just when it seems there couldn’t possibly be more, the kids will come up with a reason to have another, for example, groups of kids going to Homecoming together will design and buy their own “group shirts” and wear them to school.  (And I thought it was bad enough that the mums made kids feel excluded– if they don’t wear a T-shirt, they’re a loser, too!)  The volleyball team makes it to the playoffs? Long-sleeved T-shirts for everyone. What, you’re not wearing one? Don’t you have any spirit? The girls soccer team makes it to State.  A T-shirt is created.  They win State.  Another tee.  My daughter makes it into the spring musical, and I order a tee commemorating the milestone at the parents’ meeting– but my daughter wishes she had one of the show’s “hoodies” instead.  The freshman “girls ask guys” dance is this Saturday night, and what did all the freshmen who will be attending wear today? Specially designed T-shirts celebrating the occasion, even though it snowed like crazy in North Texas all day (go figure!). 

I think the school ought to sell really cool-looking, exclusive T-shirts that say “I made it on time to school every day this week” or “I passed math”– seriously, I’ll bet it would help attendance and grades.  If you offer a tee, they will buy.  Or at least their parents will.

Not long ago, I put a moratorium on buying T-shirts– I told my teen, “If you want one, you pay for it.” The mom of my daughter’s date for this Saturday’s dance, who has another child who is a senior, sympathized with me, but said even though there are a lot of T-shirt order forms thrown at us each year, she sees it as a cheap wardrobe, especially for boys.  Hmmm… I’d never thought of it that way before…if my daughter’s closet suddenly filled up with $10-$15 T-shirts, literally overflowed with T-shirts, maybe she wouldn’t beg for $50 blouses and cardigans she only wears once…  

NAHHH!!